Beginners Song - Twinkle Twinkle Little Star (C-F-G7)

(++++ This page is still under construction+++)


--- Don't laugh, this cute little song is worthy of some "Serious Musical Attention" (SMA :-)

And it introduces us to lots of Important Basic Ukulele Musical Knowledge and Notation Tools...

Here is a simple notation document for a basic 3 Chord version with a simple strum pattern:


Twinkle_chords_and_lyrics.JPG


Some youtube video examples would be nice...


1. I was hoping to find a very simple basic version on youtube, but so far...the quality of what I have seen is poor...

So this first version is NOT a simple basic version -- it is an "expert version" performed by an 11 year old ukulele prodigy: Kevin Loh, from August 2009. And his title page already explains what I was also hoping to keep as a surprise! :-)

But, Yes: The music for "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star" (not the poem) was composed by Mozart 230 years ago; it is catalogued as K265.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=08LxVLehP3o

2. I will keep searching for more basic tutorial type youtube videos...

This is advanced also (a "Finger Picking Solo"), but at least you can imagine some students playing this at some point in their life...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&v=rHACx9NrgKQ&feature=endscreen


3. Finally! I found a Beginner Version of TTLS, by a real person, learning to play her ukulele: Thank you Miami!

She wrote in her description: "This is the first song I learned to play on my new Ukukele I got for Christmas. It's a tenor..." :-)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RT0sygoWyvE&feature=related

&&&...


Meanwhile: Some brief notes (words ;-)


1. Okay, You know the C chord and the F chord and the "Triangle" G chord, so now you get to meet the "Opposite Triangle" G7 chord, which is actually easier to position your fingers on the strings, than the cousin G chord. Try it, you will see what I mean...

2. Now there is some Musical Theory to understand about the relationship between a "regular alphabet" chord and its 7th chord "Cousin" (G-G7, C-C7, A-A7, etc.)...

But that would require several pages of text and musical examples...for another time and place :-)

But simply put, the "regular letter" chord sounds like a "home-base" chord,

a tone that is sufficient to itself, a restful tone, that doesn't seem to need-to-travel anywhere...

However the 7th chords are restless, in motion, edgy, and need-to-travel to another sound/tone "place"...

They are the bluesy and jazzy and boogie chords, that you will come to love, for their "edgy excitement" and "traveling shoes"... :-)

Playful Exercise:


1. Play this chord progression: C-F-G-C (slowly :-)

and feel the "journey of sounds" that travel from your fingers.... C.... F.... G.... C....

Each chord by itself, doesn't have to go anywhere, but when you do get back to Chord C, it does "feel" nice!

Because Musically, you just took a little walk and got back to where you started = "home base" :-)

The Musical Progression gets "Completed", "Resolved", "Comes Full Circle", "travels-a-little journey" and then comes back to Rest,

at the C chord... :-)

You will be noticing this in many more songs, that the C Chord is often the Beginning and End of a song...

The C chord is a favorite "Home-Base" Chord... It doesn't have to be, but it seems to happen a lot...

(Think about this, ...every now-and-then... "hmmm...")



2. Now play C7-A7- G7-C7 (or other variations of different chords you can experiment with...) and how does that sound? ...Different! :-) These chords can sound "bluesy"...and they have "edgy edges"... a whole different feel to your music...


to be continued... ++++under construction++++

we didn't even get to Twinkle Twinkle Little Star!... I told you, there is lots going on with this little "Twinkle" song...

Lefty Allen...